Impact Of The 1900 Buganda Agreement On Uganda

Buganda should now be a protectorate province and be transformed into a constitutional monarchy, greatly strengthening the power of the Lukiiko (Advisory Council) and reducing the role of the Kabaka. [1] The British also gained the right to veto Kabaka`s future decisions and control many other appointments. [5] These provisions relating to the roles of the Kabaka and Lukiiko were largely reversed by the Buganda Agreement of 1961. [5] On Tuesday, March 10, exactly 120 years will have passed since the kingdom of Buganda under Kabaka (king) Daudi Chwa jumped into bed with the British. Not only did the signing of the agreement take away the Kingdom`s rights, but it also paved the way for sponsorship and looting of other parts of Uganda. The agreement consolidated British rule in Buganda and also gave the Baganda the opportunity to extend their influence to other parts of the country. Territories that were not under the kingdoms were taken over by the Neocolonians of Buganda like Semei Kakungulu. Daudi Chwa, a miner when the deal was signed, said when he came of age that British control had watered down his authority. My current position is so precocious that I am no longer the direct leader of my people. I am considered by my subjects only as one of the servants paid by the United Kingdom. This is only due to the fact that I don`t really have power over my people, even over the chief`s smallest desk,” Chwa said, according to Baganda and the British supremacy of 1900-1995 by Low and Pratt. Any order given, whether by my local chief or by the Lukiiko themselves, is always regarded with contempt, unless confirmed by the provincial commissioner. Chwa`s oath growing up showed how much Buganda had been subjected. As a result, the three regents – Sir Apollo Kaggwa, Zakaria Kisingiri and Stanislas Mugwanya – signed on behalf of Chwa, while Sir Harry Johnson signed on behalf of King Edward VII.

In accordance with Article 6 of the agreement, the Kabakaship ceded its authority and power to the colonialists. As long as the Kabaka, chiefs and people of Uganda comply with the laws and regulations put in place for their organization and management of the Kingdom of Uganda in question, His Majesty`s Government will agree to recognize Kabaka as the national ruler of Buganda Province under the protection and rule of His Majesty.” indicates Article 6 of the Agreement. . . .